fashion

fashion

(Parte 2 de 5)

Most chapters are infused with WWD photographs of design silhouettes, fabric examples, or muslin shapes for greater reference value. Color rendering, now integrated thoughout the textbook, includes photographic examples of current designer reference with more in-depth, mixed media illustration techniques to explore. The first two chapters, on basic figure drawing, have been expanded with trendier, elongated fashion forms. Chapter Three, Model Drawing, in all new layouts, now reflects your classroom experience, with more figure analysis and new runway poses. The fashion heads chapter provides more concise sketching methods and new WWD fashion faces to draw. The chapters on fashion design garment detail incorporate all of the previous edition’s successful sketching techniques but now have been updated to include WWD pictoral reference that supplements your designer image research. Chapter Seven, with a full component of WWD images, focuses on specific types of fabrics matched to their colored pencil and marker rendering solutions. The menswear and childrenswear chapters, both updated, have been revised to offer more stylistic sketching options. The chapter on flats and specs has been changed to create a broader base of more detailed drawing instructions. This textbook’s unique appendix, containing more than 400 garment and accessory references for fashion nomenclature, has been updated and (drawing) Problem Spots has been completely redone to reflect new sketching issues. Throughout this sixth edition, there are over a dozen new guest artist spreads, which serve as guides and goals for all of your drawing skills. A DVD is also included. There are six video segments that demonstrate mixed media rendering techniques. It provides a broader platform to help you fully develop your fashion design illustrations.

What can be more fun than drawing for a living? The more I know about fashion, the more I want to sketch. I approach drawing and teaching, in this ever-changing field of expertise, with the same enthusiasm as my first day in class. I was thrilled then and feel the same sense of excitement today. I love my career choice. I can’t imagine ever being bored by my job. Drawing for me is as important as breathing—it’s that vital to my being. I sincerely hope and encourage you to feel the same way about your career. Enjoy each page, and every moment of learning, reach for your full potential, and believe in your talent as much as I do and did to create this sixth edition.

Preface

The sixth edition of Fashion Sketchbook is in full color. It is completely revised, with updated drawing instructions and new images in every chapter. Many of the photos are Women’s Wear Daily fashion runway and showroom photos that inform and maximize lesson goals. The photos will inspire as well as fuel your fashion illustrations, with a stronger connection to the fashion design studio or classroom experience. The goal is to accelerate comprehension, application, and diversification of your drawing skills.

Most chapters are infused with WWD photographs of design silhouettes, fabric examples, or muslin shapes for greater reference value. Color rendering, now integrated thoughout the textbook, includes photographic examples of current designer reference with more in-depth, mixed media illustration techniques to explore. The first two chapters, on basic figure drawing, have been expanded with trendier, elongated fashion forms. Chapter Three, Model Drawing, in all new layouts, now reflects your classroom experience, with more figure analysis and new runway poses. The fashion heads chapter provides more concise sketching methods and new WWD fashion faces to draw. The chapters on fashion design garment detail incorporate all of the previous edition’s successful sketching techniques but now have been updated to include WWD pictoral reference that supplements your designer image research. Chapter Seven, with a full component of WWD images, focuses on specific types of fabrics matched to their colored pencil and marker rendering solutions. The menswear and childrenswear chapters, both updated, have been revised to offer more stylistic sketching options. The chapter on flats and specs has been changed to create a broader base of more detailed drawing instructions. This textbook’s unique appendix, containing more than 400 garment and accessory references for fashion nomenclature, has been updated and (drawing) Problem Spots has been completely redone to reflect new sketching issues. Throughout this sixth edition, there are over a dozen new guest artist spreads, which serve as guides and goals for all of your drawing skills. A DVD is also included. There are six video segments that demonstrate mixed media rendering techniques. It provides a broader platform to help you fully develop your fashion design illustrations.

What can be more fun than drawing for a living? The more I know about fashion, the more I want to sketch. I approach drawing and teaching, in this ever-changing field of expertise, with the same enthusiasm as my first day in class. I was thrilled then and feel the same sense of excitement today. I love my career choice. I can’t imagine ever being bored by my job. Drawing for me is as important as breathing—it’s that vital to my being. I sincerely hope and encourage you to feel the same way about your career. Enjoy each page, and every moment of learning, reach for your full potential, and believe in your talent as much as I do and did to create this sixth edition.

Preface xiixii xiii

Acknowledgments

My revisions for this sixth edition were extensive. So much hard work, time, and talent have gone into this book’s success and for that I thank the entire creative and sales teams at Fairchild Books. Appreciation, applause, and accolades to Jackie, Sarah, Liz, Amy, and Carly. Their time, talent, and tenacity in making all things possible for this edition were amazing. This sincere thanks includes Beth, Avital, and Katie for their talents and teamwork. More thanks to all of the gracious designers, photographers, and exquisite models whose work here will inspire so many future fashion talents. Special thanks to Felicia DaCosta for her insight, for beautiful knit samples, and for coordinating the guest artists. I am very grateful to Joseph Pescatore for the exquisite muslin samples and the fashion shoot of the heritage designer garments. I thank all of the talented fashion designers whose motivating design illustrations are featured in this book, encouraging the next generation and helping them to develop their style and potential. Thanks to all of this book’s reviewers for their generous support and suggestions. To my colleagues and students I offer special thanks. It is always an honor to work with you.

Tools & Equipment Hints

Paper The variety in paper is at once wonderful and daunting. You have to read the covers of the pads carefully to find out what kind of paper it is. Most regular sketching papers come in two surfaces: “vellum,” which is slightly rough, and “plate,” which is smooth. They perform differently, so test each kind to find out what works for you. Smooth paper can be fast to sketch on and is great when working with pens. Rougher paper is slower and its surface is great for pencil. Marker papers come in varying degrees of transparency, whiteness, and workability. You need to try out at least two separate brands and then test strip your markers on them. Always use the top or front of the paper because the back of it will probably perform differently. Watercolor papers come in pads or in single sheets. For fashion use, the watercolor paper with a slightly pebbled surface, as opposed to the very rough surface, works better. Rough papers are too “thirsty” and take too long to paint.

Tracing Paper As with other paper, each paper company makes unique tracing paper. Some are more transparent than others; they can also vary in thickness. A few varieties are quite smooth and can handle all media; others, of lesser quality, will not stand up to extensive use. Most tracing paper is used as a cover for your work or as a preliminary test run for conceptual planning. All tracing paper is limited in use except for its see-through abilities. It is also great for corrections and useful as overlays on a sketch.

Graphite/Ebony Pencils Graphite pencils look like regular writing pencils that are sheathed in wood. Ebony pencils can be all lead with just a plastic coating. The difference is that these drawing pencils come in hard or soft leads that vary from H for hard to B for soft. You will need to test these leads to see how light the Hs are and how dark the Bs are. All of these leads are delicate, however. If you drop them, the lead in the wood casing can crack and will be difficult to sharpen because the lead will continue to break all the way down the shaft of the pencil. There are also mechanical pencils. These are holders into which you place leads, which you buy separately. Again, these leads come in H (hard) and B (soft) designations.

xiixii xiii

Acknowledgments

My revisions for this sixth edition were extensive. So much hard work, time, and talent have gone into this book’s success and for that I thank the entire creative and sales teams at Fairchild Books. Appreciation, applause, and accolades to Jackie, Sarah, Liz, Amy, and Carly. Their time, talent, and tenacity in making all things possible for this edition were amazing. This sincere thanks includes Beth, Avital, and Katie for their talents and teamwork. More thanks to all of the gracious designers, photographers, and exquisite models whose work here will inspire so many future fashion talents. Special thanks to Felicia DaCosta for her insight, for beautiful knit samples, and for coordinating the guest artists. I am very grateful to Joseph Pescatore for the exquisite muslin samples and the fashion shoot of the heritage designer garments. I thank all of the talented fashion designers whose motivating design illustrations are featured in this book, encouraging the next generation and helping them to develop their style and potential. Thanks to all of this book’s reviewers for their generous support and suggestions. To my colleagues and students I offer special thanks. It is always an honor to work with you.

Tools & Equipment Hints

Paper The variety in paper is at once wonderful and daunting. You have to read the covers of the pads carefully to find out what kind of paper it is. Most regular sketching papers come in two surfaces: “vellum,” which is slightly rough, and “plate,” which is smooth. They perform differently, so test each kind to find out what works for you. Smooth paper can be fast to sketch on and is great when working with pens. Rougher paper is slower and its surface is great for pencil. Marker papers come in varying degrees of transparency, whiteness, and workability. You need to try out at least two separate brands and then test strip your markers on them. Always use the top or front of the paper because the back of it will probably perform differently. Watercolor papers come in pads or in single sheets. For fashion use, the watercolor paper with a slightly pebbled surface, as opposed to the very rough surface, works better. Rough papers are too “thirsty” and take too long to paint.

Tracing Paper As with other paper, each paper company makes unique tracing paper. Some are more transparent than others; they can also vary in thickness. A few varieties are quite smooth and can handle all media; others, of lesser quality, will not stand up to extensive use. Most tracing paper is used as a cover for your work or as a preliminary test run for conceptual planning. All tracing paper is limited in use except for its see-through abilities. It is also great for corrections and useful as overlays on a sketch.

Graphite/Ebony Pencils Graphite pencils look like regular writing pencils that are sheathed in wood. Ebony pencils can be all lead with just a plastic coating. The difference is that these drawing pencils come in hard or soft leads that vary from H for hard to B for soft. You will need to test these leads to see how light the Hs are and how dark the Bs are. All of these leads are delicate, however. If you drop them, the lead in the wood casing can crack and will be difficult to sharpen because the lead will continue to break all the way down the shaft of the pencil. There are also mechanical pencils. These are holders into which you place leads, which you buy separately. Again, these leads come in H (hard) and B (soft) designations.

xivxiv

Colored Pencils There are three types that you will need: (1) Those that have hard leads; (2) the kind that have soft leads; and (3) the type that are water-color based. As a rule, the thicker the lead in the pencil, the softer and darker the pencil will be. Harder leads in the pencil will give you a crisper line quality. Watercolor pencils fall in between hard and soft leads. You want to learn control techniques for each type of pencil because they can perform very differently in the rendering process.

Pens Pens come in as many types of points or nibs as markers do. There are fine, chiseled, broad, and medium. Some have felt tips, while others have metal or plastic tips. Some are supposed to be waterproof or permanent, which means that they will not run or bleed when you use them with other media. Be skeptical and always test the limits of your pens.

Brush Pens These are pens with a tip similar to a brush—a paintbrush. Some brush pens come in different-width tips which are equal to a #2- or a #7-size paintbrush. In addition to black, they also come in colors. Test the black brush pens because some of them have a reddish cast while others tend to be more grayish than pure black.

Markers There are many different types of markers. Each manufacturer uses different chemicals that act as the coloring agent. Before you buy any marker, test it to ensure that it is “wet”—not dried out—and to see if it can be used in conjunction with another brand of marker. Most markers are compatible. There are different options for refills, many types of points, and a vast array of colors. Some markers are toxic. Remember to always put the cap back on tightly after each use and keep markers out of the reach of children.

Water-based Paints Both gouache and watercolors mix with water; gouache is opaque, while watercolor is transparent. These paints are used to create washes. Experiment with both types to find which will work for you. There is an incredible range of possibilities for using these paints, varying from intense to delicate for any single color. Practice blending the ratio of water to your paints slowly so you do not create bubbles. Gouache and watercolor paints are very different, but they can be used together in your rendering. Inks can be used, too. Inks are much brighter colors and work well in conjunction with watercolors.

Brushes Brushes come in various sizes. They range roughly from size 0 to size 12. Beyond the size of their tips (which can be pointed or flat), you will notice they are available in different hairs or fibers. Some brushes are made with natural animal hairs. These are usually the best; they last the longest without becoming permanently stained or losing their shape. Find a brush that has body or resistance to pressure with just enough “give” to suit your needs. When you buy a good brush, always treat it well. Clean it after each use and stand it upright on its wooden base or lay it down on its side so the tip will not become bent.

(Parte 2 de 5)

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