fashion

fashion

(Parte 3 de 5)

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Colored Pencils There are three types that you will need: (1) Those that have hard leads; (2) the kind that have soft leads; and (3) the type that are water-color based. As a rule, the thicker the lead in the pencil, the softer and darker the pencil will be. Harder leads in the pencil will give you a crisper line quality. Watercolor pencils fall in between hard and soft leads. You want to learn control techniques for each type of pencil because they can perform very differently in the rendering process.

Pens Pens come in as many types of points or nibs as markers do. There are fine, chiseled, broad, and medium. Some have felt tips, while others have metal or plastic tips. Some are supposed to be waterproof or permanent, which means that they will not run or bleed when you use them with other media. Be skeptical and always test the limits of your pens.

Brush Pens These are pens with a tip similar to a brush—a paintbrush. Some brush pens come in different-width tips which are equal to a #2- or a #7-size paintbrush. In addition to black, they also come in colors. Test the black brush pens because some of them have a reddish cast while others tend to be more grayish than pure black.

Markers There are many different types of markers. Each manufacturer uses different chemicals that act as the coloring agent. Before you buy any marker, test it to ensure that it is “wet”—not dried out—and to see if it can be used in conjunction with another brand of marker. Most markers are compatible. There are different options for refills, many types of points, and a vast array of colors. Some markers are toxic. Remember to always put the cap back on tightly after each use and keep markers out of the reach of children.

Water-based Paints Both gouache and watercolors mix with water; gouache is opaque, while watercolor is transparent. These paints are used to create washes. Experiment with both types to find which will work for you. There is an incredible range of possibilities for using these paints, varying from intense to delicate for any single color. Practice blending the ratio of water to your paints slowly so you do not create bubbles. Gouache and watercolor paints are very different, but they can be used together in your rendering. Inks can be used, too. Inks are much brighter colors and work well in conjunction with watercolors.

Brushes Brushes come in various sizes. They range roughly from size 0 to size 12. Beyond the size of their tips (which can be pointed or flat), you will notice they are available in different hairs or fibers. Some brushes are made with natural animal hairs. These are usually the best; they last the longest without becoming permanently stained or losing their shape. Find a brush that has body or resistance to pressure with just enough “give” to suit your needs. When you buy a good brush, always treat it well. Clean it after each use and stand it upright on its wooden base or lay it down on its side so the tip will not become bent.

In this chapter, after all of the figure work of the earlier chapters, the focus moves to clothing, dressing the figure in some of the staple fashion design details that show up every season. Basic sketching methods are used to help you design on the figure and to create some simple silhouettes. Garment detailing of necklines, collars, and cuffs will be incorporated into easy tops, pants, and skirts for faster drawing exercises. While dressing the figure from top to bottom typically is defined as a silouette, this chapter will explore how to shift your focus from exterior shape to interior drape, making dressing the figure a more informative yet imaginative process.

In this chapter, there is more fashion clothing in both studio muslins and WWD runway and studio photos to study and draw. You will learn how to sketch fabric in loose folds, precise pleats, or other basic garment details so that they fit contours of the body while presenting your design visions.

Research into almost any period of fashion or art history will turn up wonderful references that you can apply to your own illustration and design techniques for fashion. Almost any book on fashion decades will have plenty of archival illustration for you to find stylistic inspiration or to observe how other artists handled drawing or rendering clothing.

Garments and Garment Details

In this chapter, after all of the figure work of the earlier chapters, the focus moves to clothing, dressing the figure in some of the staple fashion design details that show up every season. Basic sketching methods are used to help you design on the figure and to create some simple silhouettes. Garment detailing of necklines, collars, and cuffs will be incorporated into easy tops, pants, and skirts for faster drawing exercises. While dressing the figure from top to bottom typically is defined as a silouette, this chapter will explore how to shift your focus from exterior shape to interior drape, making dressing the figure a more informative yet imaginative process.

In this chapter, there is more fashion clothing in both studio muslins and WWD runway and studio photos to study and draw. You will learn how to sketch fabric in loose folds, precise pleats, or other basic garment details so that they fit contours of the body while presenting your design visions.

Research into almost any period of fashion or art history will turn up wonderful references that you can apply to your own illustration and design techniques for fashion. Almost any book on fashion decades will have plenty of archival illustration for you to find stylistic inspiration or to observe how other artists handled drawing or rendering clothing.

Garments and Garment Details

108FASHION SKETCHBOOK109FIVE | GARMENTS AND GARMENT DETAILS

Sketching Necklines and Collars

Necklines move above or below the base of the neck. They often follow the basic sewing lines on the torso. Collars are connected to the neckline, draped above or below the neck, set down on the shoulders or spread across the chest. To dress the neck, to draw and design necklines and collars, utilize the sewing lines on the torso as a guide. Collars sewn above the base of the neck usually follow the cylindrical form of the neck, reflecting the base of the neck’s contour. Collars below the base of the neck usually follow the shoulderline angles.

Notched collars are full of design variety in their widths, cuts, and closure details. Most are based on a V-neckline, with a single- or double-breasted closure, as shown here.

Round NeckV-NeckSquare Neck

Neckline for Collar Collar Dressingthe Neck

Collar Dressing the Shoulderline

V-Neck Collar Single-Breasted Notched Collar

Collar Height

Round Jewel NecklineFinished Band Collar

Band Collar Open to One Side

Band Collar

This is the inside structure or base for the spread or shirt collar.

Spread or Shirt Collar

This collar has “wings” sewn on the band that help the collar stand up, away from the neck, to rest on the shoulderline.

Spread or Shirt Collar

Notched Collar

Convertible Collar

Convertible Collar

Here part of the bodice, when open, appears to be part of the collar, folding over, until the bodice is closed.

Convertible Collar Closed

Notched Collar

The notch is the cutaway section of a single or two-part collar. The cutaway usually creates some form of a “V.”

Lapels

This is the name given to the bottom portion of this type of collar when it is on a suit jacket or coat.

Notched “V”

Band Collar

108FASHION SKETCHBOOK109FIVE | GARMENTS AND GARMENT DETAILS

Sketching Necklines and Collars

Necklines move above or below the base of the neck. They often follow the basic sewing lines on the torso. Collars are connected to the neckline, draped above or below the neck, set down on the shoulders or spread across the chest. To dress the neck, to draw and design necklines and collars, utilize the sewing lines on the torso as a guide. Collars sewn above the base of the neck usually follow the cylindrical form of the neck, reflecting the base of the neck’s contour. Collars below the base of the neck usually follow the shoulderline angles.

Notched collars are full of design variety in their widths, cuts, and closure details. Most are based on a V-neckline, with a single- or double-breasted closure, as shown here.

Round NeckV-NeckSquare Neck

Neckline for Collar Collar Dressingthe Neck

Collar Dressing the Shoulderline

V-Neck Collar Single-Breasted Notched Collar

Collar Height

Round Jewel NecklineFinished Band Collar

Band Collar Open to One Side

Band Collar

This is the inside structure or base for the spread or shirt collar.

Spread or Shirt Collar

This collar has “wings” sewn on the band that help the collar stand up, away from the neck, to rest on the shoulderline.

Spread or Shirt Collar

Notched Collar

Convertible Collar

Convertible Collar

Here part of the bodice, when open, appears to be part of the collar, folding over, until the bodice is closed.

Convertible Collar Closed

Notched Collar

The notch is the cutaway section of a single or two-part collar. The cutaway usually creates some form of a “V.”

Lapels

This is the name given to the bottom portion of this type of collar when it is on a suit jacket or coat.

Notched “V”

Band Collar

110FASHION SKETCHBOOK111FIVE | GARMENTS AND GARMENT DETAILS

Sketching Sleeves

Inset Armhole Cap Sleeve

Puff Sleeve

Sleeveless

Near Far

Without Sleeves

1. The armhole lines follow the curve of the center front.

2. Arm on the fur side is behind the chest. Arm on the near side is in front of the chest.

3. Matching armhole curves.

Cap Sleeve

4. Lines across the chest will help you even out the sleeve details.

5. Measure the depth of a cap sleeve, matching up the sleeves on both sides.

6. The angle on a cap sleeve is open. You can see up into it.

Cap Sleeve

Bishop Sleeve on a Blouse

Fitted Shoulder

Sketching Sleeves on a Three-Quarter- Turned Pose with a Straight Arm

Sleeve stops before the wrist to leave room for the cuff.

1. The fit of the sleeve from its top to bottom. 2. The shape of the sleeve as it fits the arm. 3. The drape of the sleeve near the elbow. 4. Example of the finished illustration of this sleeve.

Full-Length Sleeve on a Blazer

Padded Shoulder

1234Sleeve fits over the wrist.

7. The contour of the armhole follows the contour direction of center front.

8. A puff sleeve has volume. Get the outline to stand up, away from the arm.

9. The puff sleeve has gathers emanating from the armhole, the elastic casing, or both.

Puff Sleeve

110FASHION SKETCHBOOK111FIVE | GARMENTS AND GARMENT DETAILS

Sketching Sleeves

Inset Armhole Cap Sleeve

Puff Sleeve

Sleeveless

Near Far

Without Sleeves

1. The armhole lines follow the curve of the center front.

2. Arm on the fur side is behind the chest. Arm on the near side is in front of the chest.

3. Matching armhole curves.

Cap Sleeve

4. Lines across the chest will help you even out the sleeve details.

5. Measure the depth of a cap sleeve, matching up the sleeves on both sides.

6. The angle on a cap sleeve is open. You can see up into it.

Cap Sleeve

Bishop Sleeve on a Blouse

Fitted Shoulder

Sketching Sleeves on a Three-Quarter- Turned Pose with a Straight Arm

Sleeve stops before the wrist to leave room for the cuff.

1. The fit of the sleeve from its top to bottom. 2. The shape of the sleeve as it fits the arm. 3. The drape of the sleeve near the elbow. 4. Example of the finished illustration of this sleeve.

Full-Length Sleeve on a Blazer

Padded Shoulder

1234Sleeve fits over the wrist.

7. The contour of the armhole follows the contour direction of center front.

8. A puff sleeve has volume. Get the outline to stand up, away from the arm.

9. The puff sleeve has gathers emanating from the armhole, the elastic casing, or both.

Puff Sleeve

113FIVE | GARMENTS AND GARMENT DETAILS112FASHION SKETCHBOOK

Sketching Blouses and Dresses

Armhole Shape

Back ViewCuff• Closure

Direction Implied

A. Construction Detailing B.Controlled Shape

Illustrated on this spread is one of many approaches to dressing the figure in a blouse or a dress. It begins at the base of the neck, includes the waist, moving down to the hemline. It doesn’t matter which side you start first (left or right) as long as you complete one area of definition before going on to the next. You can use the natural contours of the chest to get the blouse or dress to drape over the form if the fabric has any cling factors.

The sketching setups on the facing page illustrate how some of the sewing lines can help support the development of garment details on the figure. They also serve to define the areas of focus, like completing the bodice details before drawing the sleeves.

Begin with the neckline or collar shapes.

Follow sewing line construction panel details.

Define the bodice— how wide or long the shape will be.

Finish sleeves— use drape lines to soften shapes.

Collar and Button Packet • Bodice Shape • Sleeve and Cuff • Completed Sketch

Working with center front on a pose.Planning details using construction sewing lines.

Defining shape for bodice and skirt of dress. Completed sketch.

113FIVE | GARMENTS AND GARMENT DETAILS112FASHION SKETCHBOOK

Sketching Blouses and Dresses

Armhole Shape

Back ViewCuff• Closure

Direction Implied

A. Construction Detailing B.Controlled Shape

Illustrated on this spread is one of many approaches to dressing the figure in a blouse or a dress. It begins at the base of the neck, includes the waist, moving down to the hemline. It doesn’t matter which side you start first (left or right) as long as you complete one area of definition before going on to the next. You can use the natural contours of the chest to get the blouse or dress to drape over the form if the fabric has any cling factors.

The sketching setups on the facing page illustrate how some of the sewing lines can help support the development of garment details on the figure. They also serve to define the areas of focus, like completing the bodice details before drawing the sleeves.

Begin with the neckline or collar shapes.

Follow sewing line construction panel details.

Define the bodice— how wide or long the shape will be.

Finish sleeves— use drape lines to soften shapes.

Collar and Button Packet • Bodice Shape • Sleeve and Cuff • Completed Sketch

Working with center front on a pose.Planning details using construction sewing lines.

Defining shape for bodice and skirt of dress. Completed sketch.

115FIVE | GARMENTS AND GARMENT DETAILS114FASHION SKETCHBOOK

Sketching Skirts

Fashion Design Elongation:

Exaggerated leg length.

Flat Figure Template:

Realistic, equal leg length. See pants template.

On this diagram, each band of gray represents the hemline location, its name, and proportion in relationship to the legs.

Mid- Thigh

Knee

Mid- Calf

Ankle Toes

Micro

Mini or Tennis

Short

Above Knee

Knee

Below Knee

Midi

Maxi

Tea Ankle

Full or Long

Some drape or construction details are taken for granted and are too fine or tiny to illustrate on the dressed figure or in a flat. Here are a few things that can be done on your sketch.

Line quality makes the difference in a seam; use completed lines for seams; use broken lines for stitching. Practice drawing all types of lines with your extrafine and ultra-thin pens.

(Parte 3 de 5)

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